I'm Victor.

Cinema, animation, art, architecture, Disney, sci-fi/fantasy, comics, toys, Discworld.

They say I'm an eccentric billionaire.
Posts I Like

reckless-ssshenanigans:

Starkid releases their packed summer season schedule with more to come (x)

(via fuckyeahstarkidpotter)

perel:

what a man

perel:

what a man

(via misswendybird)

cjthearchitect:

ALL OF MY YES.

(via potatofarmgirl)

I’m watching this 90s Disney TV special thing and they keep cutting to 30 year-old Tom Hanks talking about his love of Walt Disney and I’m like, this skinny kid with the afro is going to become fat, bloated Walt Disney some day.

My Maya midterm project.

Stitch’s red spaceship!

Nostalgia Chick is drunk-tweeting her love of Steven Spielberg and it’s making me a very happy Kong.

lindsayetumbls:

"Not gonna work tonight!" Told self after long week. Then spent hours drinking whiskey and trawling the "Steven Spielberg" tag.

lindsayetumbls:

"Not gonna work tonight!" Told self after long week. Then spent hours drinking whiskey and trawling the "Steven Spielberg" tag.

darrensafromoved:

Favorite Moments From StarKid Musicals 

A Very Potter Musical “That is a boss Zefron Poster!”

(via fuckyeahstarkidpotter)

neilcicierega:

A lot of people are asking why i used a picture of Paul McCartney for my mashup of John Lennon’s “Imagine”.
I thought the answer was obvious. Paul McCartney IS John Lennon
Everyone knows that the original Paul McCartney died some time in the 1960s and was replaced by a double. But I guess you only know half the story. When choosing a replacement impostor they realized that only one person knew Paul and his mannerisms well enough to convincingly portray him: John Lennon in facial prosthetics.
Obviously they could never be seen together in public. This is why the Beatles stopped performing and became a studio-only band (John playing Paul’s parts via multitracking techniques which quickly proved creatively revolutionary.) Nonetheless, the magic act was very taxing on John, and the Beatles eventually had to split up so he could perform both lives separately.
When he was non-fatally wounded by a bullet in 1980, he realized he was at a crossroads. He had come to enjoy his life and career as Paul McCartney, who was at an all time creative high with hits like “Temporary Secretary" and "Wonderful Christmastime”. And so, he faked his death as John Lennon and assumed the role of Paul full time.
So next time you’re mourning the premature loss of the great songwriter John Lennon, just think about him in 1985, healthily and contentedly singing “Spies Like Us" under 20 pounds of Hollywood makeup.

neilcicierega:

A lot of people are asking why i used a picture of Paul McCartney for my mashup of John Lennon’s “Imagine”.

I thought the answer was obvious. Paul McCartney IS John Lennon

Everyone knows that the original Paul McCartney died some time in the 1960s and was replaced by a double. But I guess you only know half the story. When choosing a replacement impostor they realized that only one person knew Paul and his mannerisms well enough to convincingly portray him: John Lennon in facial prosthetics.

Obviously they could never be seen together in public. This is why the Beatles stopped performing and became a studio-only band (John playing Paul’s parts via multitracking techniques which quickly proved creatively revolutionary.) Nonetheless, the magic act was very taxing on John, and the Beatles eventually had to split up so he could perform both lives separately.

When he was non-fatally wounded by a bullet in 1980, he realized he was at a crossroads. He had come to enjoy his life and career as Paul McCartney, who was at an all time creative high with hits like “Temporary Secretary" and "Wonderful Christmastime”. And so, he faked his death as John Lennon and assumed the role of Paul full time.

So next time you’re mourning the premature loss of the great songwriter John Lennon, just think about him in 1985, healthily and contentedly singing “Spies Like Us" under 20 pounds of Hollywood makeup.

134,642 plays

neilcicierega:

You may say I’m a dreamer

but the media men beg to differ

productiveslacker:

I’d like to talk about Prince Hans for a moment here. All of the love for this character sickens me to my core. Yes, I know it’s a Disney movie, but this is important that people understand why his character exists and why you should dislike him. (I can’t believe I even have to make an argument for this).
I get it, Hans is an extremely attractive character, but he is a VILLAIN and one of the most ruthless Disney has created yet. Hans is a new kind of Disney villain because he is charming, likeable, and cute (at least at the beginning of the movie). I mean, Lotso was fluffy and smelled like strawberries and was a villain (and the Disney Store sells plushies of him? The villain that sent our beloved heroes to the trash incinerator?? Ugh, merchandise, what are you doing.) However, I have a different problem here because Hans is a human. There are attractive sociopaths like him out there in the real world, and it’s scary as hell. People that will seduce the naïve into getting what they want and then leaving them. People that will break hearts and think nothing about it. People that will claim to love you to use you, then leave you with nothing. Yet, people keep falling into their trap because they are good actors and people find them attractive. This is a real issue, and I am so thankful that the creators of Frozen addressed this in the movie by creating a cute villain. It shows that not all villains are ugly, some are just hot guys that girls will fall for based on their good looks and that nice guy act that they will put on for a while. (And maybe sing REALLY ADORABLE SONGS. WHY DID THEY GIVE A HEARTLESS LUNATIC SUCH A FUN SONG AUGH.) I digress. The sad thing is though is that some girls just don’t get it. “Team Hans” is a thing? REALLY? Have you guys seen the end of the movie? Prince Hans claimed he loved Anna then LEFT HER TO DIE. Is him simply being cute and having a wonderful singing voice enough to ignore that? PLEASE NO. I know there will always be fans of the Disney villains and that’s okay because they are wonderfully constructed, colorful, hilarious (can I get some Hades love??) and sometimes it’s fun to like the bad guys. This whole “Team Hans” thing though? And people REALLY thinking that Anna should have stayed with Hans (did I mention he left her to die and went to go kill her sister?) over Kristoff, who actually cares about Anna as a person and wants her to be happy? WHAT?? That is awful. You’re totally missing the point here people. Stop the Hans love and I hope you all will be smart enough to stay away from the real Hanses in your life. 

Listen to the Areyna. She doth speaketh the truth.

productiveslacker:

I’d like to talk about Prince Hans for a moment here. All of the love for this character sickens me to my core. Yes, I know it’s a Disney movie, but this is important that people understand why his character exists and why you should dislike him. (I can’t believe I even have to make an argument for this).

I get it, Hans is an extremely attractive character, but he is a VILLAIN and one of the most ruthless Disney has created yet. Hans is a new kind of Disney villain because he is charming, likeable, and cute (at least at the beginning of the movie). I mean, Lotso was fluffy and smelled like strawberries and was a villain (and the Disney Store sells plushies of him? The villain that sent our beloved heroes to the trash incinerator?? Ugh, merchandise, what are you doing.) However, I have a different problem here because Hans is a human. There are attractive sociopaths like him out there in the real world, and it’s scary as hell. People that will seduce the naïve into getting what they want and then leaving them. People that will break hearts and think nothing about it. People that will claim to love you to use you, then leave you with nothing. Yet, people keep falling into their trap because they are good actors and people find them attractive. This is a real issue, and I am so thankful that the creators of Frozen addressed this in the movie by creating a cute villain. It shows that not all villains are ugly, some are just hot guys that girls will fall for based on their good looks and that nice guy act that they will put on for a while. (And maybe sing REALLY ADORABLE SONGS. WHY DID THEY GIVE A HEARTLESS LUNATIC SUCH A FUN SONG AUGH.) I digress. The sad thing is though is that some girls just don’t get it. “Team Hans” is a thing? REALLY? Have you guys seen the end of the movie? Prince Hans claimed he loved Anna then LEFT HER TO DIE. Is him simply being cute and having a wonderful singing voice enough to ignore that? PLEASE NO. I know there will always be fans of the Disney villains and that’s okay because they are wonderfully constructed, colorful, hilarious (can I get some Hades love??) and sometimes it’s fun to like the bad guys. This whole “Team Hans” thing though? And people REALLY thinking that Anna should have stayed with Hans (did I mention he left her to die and went to go kill her sister?) over Kristoff, who actually cares about Anna as a person and wants her to be happy? WHAT?? That is awful. You’re totally missing the point here people. Stop the Hans love and I hope you all will be smart enough to stay away from the real Hanses in your life. 

Listen to the Areyna. She doth speaketh the truth.


Andrei Tarkovsky"And is Chaplin—comedy? No: he is Chaplin, pure and simple; a unique phenomenon, never to be repeated. He is unadulterated hyperbole; but above all he stuns us at every moment of his screen existence with the truth of his hero’s behavior. In the most absurd situation Chaplin is completely natural; and that is why he is funny."
Buster Keaton"At his best, and Chaplin remained at his best for a long time, he was the greatest comedian that ever lived."
François Truffaut"My religion is cinema. I believe in Charlie Chaplin…"
Jean-Luc Godard"He is beyond praise because he is the greatest of all. What else can one say? The only filmmaker, anyway, to whom one can apply without misunderstanding that very misleading adjective, ‘humane’… Today one says Chaplin as one says Da Vinci—or rather Charlie, like Leonardo."
Jean Renoir"The master of masters, the filmmaker of filmmakers, for me is still Charlie Chaplin. He has done everything in his films—script, direction, setting, production, performance and even the music… His films are not only examples of perfect unity, but all his work is one. One may say indeed of Chaplin that he has made only one film and that every facet of that film is a different enactment of the same profession of faith."
Jiri Menzel"All Chaplin’s early films assured me that the comedy can say in a grotesque way much more about people’s characters than serious films, which after a certain time fade away and became ridiculous. Good comedy is immortal."
Luis Buñuel"When I was young, the idea of an orgy was tremendously exciting. Charlie Chaplin once organized one in Hollywood for me and two Spanish friends, but when the three ravishing young women arrived from Pasadena, they immediately got into a tremendous argument over which one was going to get Chaplin, and in the end all three left in a huff."
Masaki Kobayashi"Last year I went to the Cannes Film Festival and met Charles Chaplin. They showed his works. I was deeply impressed by his greatness. His films, his methods and content, are modern and so contemporary; he is a great genius."
Ousmane Sembène"[Did other filmmakers teach you anything?] There was one, an old man whom I had the fortune to meet very old, Charlie Chaplin; he told me that everyone could do this job, but that it is very demanding… He was the only guy who you couldn’t see in bars, nightclubs, or at receptions. He told me one had to stay at home and work…”
Pier Paolo Pasolini"You can always feel underneath my love for Dreyer, Mizoguchi and Chaplin… I feel this mythic epicness in both Dreyer and Mizoguchi and Chaplin: all three see things from a point of view which is absolute, essential and in a certain way holy, reverential."
Satyajit Ray"If there is any name which can be said to symbolize cinema—it is Charlie Chaplin… I am sure Chaplin’s name will survive even if the cinema ceases to exist as a medium of artistic expression. Chaplin is truly immortal."
Stanley Kubrick"If something is really happening on the screen, it isn’t crucial how it’s shot. Chaplin had such a simple cinematic style that it was almost like I Love Lucy, but you were always hypnotized by what was going on, unaware of the essentially non-cinematic style. He frequently used cheap sets, routine lighting and so forth, but he made great films. His films will probably last longer than anyone else’s.”
Vittorio De Sica"Truly good films—like Chaplin’s—should stimulate as well as soothe, should appeal to the mind as well as to the senses, should kindle thought as well as the emotions."

Andrei Tarkovsky
"And is Chaplin—comedy? No: he is Chaplin, pure and simple; a unique phenomenon, never to be repeated. He is unadulterated hyperbole; but above all he stuns us at every moment of his screen existence with the truth of his hero’s behavior. In the most absurd situation Chaplin is completely natural; and that is why he is funny."

Buster Keaton
"At his best, and Chaplin remained at his best for a long time, he was the greatest comedian that ever lived."

François Truffaut
"My religion is cinema. I believe in Charlie Chaplin…"

Jean-Luc Godard
"He is beyond praise because he is the greatest of all. What else can one say? The only filmmaker, anyway, to whom one can apply without misunderstanding that very misleading adjective, ‘humane’… Today one says Chaplin as one says Da Vinci—or rather Charlie, like Leonardo."

Jean Renoir
"The master of masters, the filmmaker of filmmakers, for me is still Charlie Chaplin. He has done everything in his films—script, direction, setting, production, performance and even the music… His films are not only examples of perfect unity, but all his work is one. One may say indeed of Chaplin that he has made only one film and that every facet of that film is a different enactment of the same profession of faith."

Jiri Menzel
"All Chaplin’s early films assured me that the comedy can say in a grotesque way much more about people’s characters than serious films, which after a certain time fade away and became ridiculous. Good comedy is immortal."

Luis Buñuel
"When I was young, the idea of an orgy was tremendously exciting. Charlie Chaplin once organized one in Hollywood for me and two Spanish friends, but when the three ravishing young women arrived from Pasadena, they immediately got into a tremendous argument over which one was going to get Chaplin, and in the end all three left in a huff."

Masaki Kobayashi
"Last year I went to the Cannes Film Festival and met Charles Chaplin. They showed his works. I was deeply impressed by his greatness. His films, his methods and content, are modern and so contemporary; he is a great genius."

Ousmane Sembène
"[Did other filmmakers teach you anything?] There was one, an old man whom I had the fortune to meet very old, Charlie Chaplin; he told me that everyone could do this job, but that it is very demanding… He was the only guy who you couldn’t see in bars, nightclubs, or at receptions. He told me one had to stay at home and work…”

Pier Paolo Pasolini
"You can always feel underneath my love for Dreyer, Mizoguchi and Chaplin… I feel this mythic epicness in both Dreyer and Mizoguchi and Chaplin: all three see things from a point of view which is absolute, essential and in a certain way holy, reverential."

Satyajit Ray
"If there is any name which can be said to symbolize cinema—it is Charlie Chaplin… I am sure Chaplin’s name will survive even if the cinema ceases to exist as a medium of artistic expression. Chaplin is truly immortal."

Stanley Kubrick
"If something is really happening on the screen, it isn’t crucial how it’s shot. Chaplin had such a simple cinematic style that it was almost like I Love Lucy, but you were always hypnotized by what was going on, unaware of the essentially non-cinematic style. He frequently used cheap sets, routine lighting and so forth, but he made great films. His films will probably last longer than anyone else’s.”

Vittorio De Sica
"Truly good films—like Chaplin’s—should stimulate as well as soothe, should appeal to the mind as well as to the senses, should kindle thought as well as the emotions."

(via fairygodmoose)